Polymer Clay 101: How long should I bake my clay for?

Polymer Clay 101: How long should I bake my clay for?

Hi everyone! For the month of June, I decided to publish beginner-friendly quick tips for polymer clay crafting each week! These are often asked questions by the beginner, and things that might take them time figuring out on their own. I know it took me quite some time figuring it these things out by myself!

This week’s often asked question is:

“How long should I bake my clay for??”

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How to Roll out Even Sheets of Worbla from Scraps

How to Roll out Even Sheets of Worbla from Scraps

Hey everyone! Today’s post will be quick and easy. This was a method I found out while I was reheating my worbla scraps the other day! I found the quick, easy solution to making even sheets was the same way I do with clay–with the pasta machine!

…Okay, the odds are pretty low that an ordinary crafter will have a pasta machine that they can just dedicate for crafts, but I do have one I use for clay. It was in the kitchen and was unused for decades. If you happen to have one you no longer use, consider using it for crafts like clay and worbla instead!

First, heat up your worbla a bit with your heat gun.
 photo IMG_4441_zpshrjghanq.jpgI let it cool to the touch and then put it through the pasta machine. Since the machine is all metal, the worbla won’t stick as long as its not too hot!
 photo IMG_4443_zps60hrxklt.jpgThis method is great because it makes the rerolled sheet completely even, and you can set a preferred thickness!

Goodluck!

Tutorial: Make Cosplay Accessories out of Polymer Clay

Tutorial: Make Cosplay Accessories out of Polymer Clay

Hi, I’m Xarin from Three Smitten Kittens, and for some of you who don’t know, I’ve been making a livelihood for about four years now, making cosplay accessories out of polymer clay. It’s such a versatile medium that you can use to make anything from your imagination, as long as you’re equipped with the proper tools and knowledge. Here’s a basic guide for making your own cosplay jewelry from clay. This guide is for flat jewelry, but you can apply the knowledge here to your other projects. 

The example we’re using today are the hair accessories for Corrin of Fire Emblem: Fates.

Before that, here are some resource materials you may need to learn about clay!

Where to Buy Clay in the Philippines

Which Polymer Clay Should I buy?

Polymer Clay Starter Kit Shopping List

STEP 1: MAKE A TEMPLATE OR PATTERN OF WHAT YOU WANT TO MAKE
 photo IMG_4235_zpshszwdpy0.jpgI have templates and patterns of almost everything I’ve ever made. I either extract the pattern from the actual reference on a software like Photoshop, or hand-draw my own pattern on paper or board, making sure to have accurate measurements. It helps make the item visibly proportioned and accurate. Having templates also gives you ease of reproduction–you can make an even, almost exact same duplicate copy, especially if you need to make something in pairs or more.
 photo IMG_4236_zpsxgldktsz.jpg
STEP 2: ROLL OUT EVEN SHEETS OF POLYMER CLAY

Making sure the sheets are perfectly even in thickness gives your accessory a professional finish. After conditioning the clay, I use a pasta machine to roll out even sheets of clay for me to use. It was an old pasta machine no one at home was using anyway, so I got permission to use it for clay. Note that once you use a pasta machine for clay, you MUST NOT use it for food again. Polymer clay, when ingested, can be toxic.Not everyone has a pasta machine or clay conditioning machine at home though, and buying some costs a lot. You can use slats instead to help guide you to getting an even thickness.

STEP 3: Cut out your clay using aid of the template.

 photo IMG_4237_zps8ehxihsp.jpgDepending on the thickness of your project, you may stack your clay on top of one another, and use a craft knife to cut your clay based on your template. I like to put the template on the clay and go over it with my acrylic roller lightly, so it “engraves” the design on the surface, and then cut based on it.

STEP 4: Assemble your accessory, bake and then add the finishing touches.
All that’s left is assembly of your item and then baking! Then you can add the finishing touches, which may be paint or varnish, and adding metal findings.
 photo corrin_etsy_main_zpsgigtrlzs.pngGoodluck and hope that helps!

Xarin

 

Whipple Craft’n Fun Creme Review

Whipple Craft’n Fun Creme Review

EVERYONE WHO KNOWS ME knows that my frustration as a crafter is making and piping fake whipped cream. For some reason (maybe my unsteady hand) it dislikes me, and it can’t turn out pretty when I do it, unlike when when the cake artists or those who make decoden phone cases. Then there’s that making icing to begin with is a pain. You can use silicone caulk from hardware stores, but you need to thicken them first. The ones that come from Japan are expensive, costing about P600.
 photo IMG_4362_zpsvpftfbqm.jpgSo browsing through a local toy store one day, I saw Whipple Craft’n Fun Creme, which as the saleslady said, is air dry fake whipped cream, retailing at P299 for a plain “flavor” and more expensive for one with two flavors/colors. I decided to grab one, since at P299 and quite a big box, it seemed like a steal.

It comes in a big box, with, thankfully, big enough content inside. I was glad there there was a lot of whipped cream here! The faux whipped cream came in a sealed piping bag with a seal and screw on cap at the piping tip, so you can reseal it with no problem after you’ve completed your project and not used up all the cream.
 photo P_20160327_092303_zpsa4aym4ip.jpgThe pack, however, does NOT come with a piping tip, so you’ll have to allocate your budget for that. Their craft kits for kids that go for P600+ have piping tips and fake food bases for kids to practice on.

Last week, I made macaron shells with Mont Marte Polymer Clay. (Check out our review of the polymer clay here, or you can also look at our tutorial on how to make your own fake macarons here.) I made them on a 1:1 real life scale, which was best to go with this cream, because I had a very big piping tip.

Sorry that I’m not making anything elaborate like a cupcake–my piping skills are very amateur! Then you’d just be looking at a hot mess.

The cream dries to the touch in a few minutes, but for it to dry all the way through, I suggest waiting for over a day. I thought it would be a silicone, rubbery finish, but it dries to a paper-clay finish, only of course finer.

Actually, it smells a lot like white glue when you pipe it out, so I can’t help but feel it’s just paper clay and white glue, which you can diy if you have fine paper clay to make it into whipped cream. The Whipple cream has the easy of being sealed tight in a convenient piping bag though, meaning you can use it whenever.
 photo macaron_with_whipple_zps6y8ajeig.jpgHere are the finished macarons!

Have you tried the Whipple cream before for your projects? What did you think about it?

You can buy Whipple Craft’m Fun Cream at toy stores like Toy Kingdom or Toys R Us nationwide.

Mont Marte Polymer Clay Review

Mont Marte Polymer Clay Review

AT THE BEGINNING of the month, when I was browsing around National Bookstore, I was surprised to find that they finally carried a line of polymer clay in their store! This line is the Mont Marte Polymer Clay line, which currently comes in very limited colors, but however is enough to get you started.
 photo IMG_4322_zpsdalqjze5.jpgI picked up two colors from National Bookstore Fairview Terraces, and they sell for P95 each for 60g of clay.
 photo IMG_4323_zpscu4fv50z.jpg
 photo IMG_4324_zpstyqig4ac.jpg

The clay itself is very soft, almost like marshmallow, but isn’t sticky to the touch unlike other soft clays. Being soft makes it easy to condition, but it isn’t as densely packed and has holes and such inside, meaning air could get trapped inside, so I’d still recommend conditioning it as much as you can.
 photo IMG_4325_zpssjhmldda.jpg
 photo IMG_4326_zpsefo2hhmo.jpg

Most soft clay brands tend to have supreme flexibility, so I tried baking a thin sheet to test the flexibility of this clay. It’s REALLY flexible, and I was even able to roll the sheet I baked like so. I imagine the clay will be great for making thin flower petals and the like.
 photo IMG_4327_zpszckkz3x1.jpg

To check for the finish when it bakes, I made some macaron shells. The finish isn’t a flat matte (like Sculpey III or Bakeshop) but it isn’t shiny either, just a bit in between.

All in all, I think this is a great clay to work with, and I’ll pick up some more when the need arises! (I have too many clay haha) The only con right now is that these really come in very limited colors, but hopefully they release a full line someday!

xoxo Xarin

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