Tutorial: Make Cosplay Accessories out of Polymer Clay

Tutorial: Make Cosplay Accessories out of Polymer Clay

Hi, I’m Xarin from Three Smitten Kittens, and for some of you who don’t know, I’ve been making a livelihood for about four years now, making cosplay accessories out of polymer clay. It’s such a versatile medium that you can use to make anything from your imagination, as long as you’re equipped with the proper tools and knowledge. Here’s a basic guide for making your own cosplay jewelry from clay. This guide is for flat jewelry, but you can apply the knowledge here to your other projects. 

The example we’re using today are the hair accessories for Corrin of Fire Emblem: Fates.

Before that, here are some resource materials you may need to learn about clay!

Where to Buy Clay in the Philippines

Which Polymer Clay Should I buy?

Polymer Clay Starter Kit Shopping List

STEP 1: MAKE A TEMPLATE OR PATTERN OF WHAT YOU WANT TO MAKE
 photo IMG_4235_zpshszwdpy0.jpgI have templates and patterns of almost everything I’ve ever made. I either extract the pattern from the actual reference on a software like Photoshop, or hand-draw my own pattern on paper or board, making sure to have accurate measurements. It helps make the item visibly proportioned and accurate. Having templates also gives you ease of reproduction–you can make an even, almost exact same duplicate copy, especially if you need to make something in pairs or more.
 photo IMG_4236_zpsxgldktsz.jpg
STEP 2: ROLL OUT EVEN SHEETS OF POLYMER CLAY

Making sure the sheets are perfectly even in thickness gives your accessory a professional finish. After conditioning the clay, I use a pasta machine to roll out even sheets of clay for me to use. It was an old pasta machine no one at home was using anyway, so I got permission to use it for clay. Note that once you use a pasta machine for clay, you MUST NOT use it for food again. Polymer clay, when ingested, can be toxic.Not everyone has a pasta machine or clay conditioning machine at home though, and buying some costs a lot. You can use slats instead to help guide you to getting an even thickness.

STEP 3: Cut out your clay using aid of the template.

 photo IMG_4237_zps8ehxihsp.jpgDepending on the thickness of your project, you may stack your clay on top of one another, and use a craft knife to cut your clay based on your template. I like to put the template on the clay and go over it with my acrylic roller lightly, so it “engraves” the design on the surface, and then cut based on it.

STEP 4: Assemble your accessory, bake and then add the finishing touches.
All that’s left is assembly of your item and then baking! Then you can add the finishing touches, which may be paint or varnish, and adding metal findings.
 photo corrin_etsy_main_zpsgigtrlzs.pngGoodluck and hope that helps!

Xarin

 

Mont Marte Polymer Clay Review

Mont Marte Polymer Clay Review

AT THE BEGINNING of the month, when I was browsing around National Bookstore, I was surprised to find that they finally carried a line of polymer clay in their store! This line is the Mont Marte Polymer Clay line, which currently comes in very limited colors, but however is enough to get you started.
 photo IMG_4322_zpsdalqjze5.jpgI picked up two colors from National Bookstore Fairview Terraces, and they sell for P95 each for 60g of clay.
 photo IMG_4323_zpscu4fv50z.jpg
 photo IMG_4324_zpstyqig4ac.jpg

The clay itself is very soft, almost like marshmallow, but isn’t sticky to the touch unlike other soft clays. Being soft makes it easy to condition, but it isn’t as densely packed and has holes and such inside, meaning air could get trapped inside, so I’d still recommend conditioning it as much as you can.
 photo IMG_4325_zpssjhmldda.jpg
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Most soft clay brands tend to have supreme flexibility, so I tried baking a thin sheet to test the flexibility of this clay. It’s REALLY flexible, and I was even able to roll the sheet I baked like so. I imagine the clay will be great for making thin flower petals and the like.
 photo IMG_4327_zpszckkz3x1.jpg

To check for the finish when it bakes, I made some macaron shells. The finish isn’t a flat matte (like Sculpey III or Bakeshop) but it isn’t shiny either, just a bit in between.

All in all, I think this is a great clay to work with, and I’ll pick up some more when the need arises! (I have too many clay haha) The only con right now is that these really come in very limited colors, but hopefully they release a full line someday!

xoxo Xarin

Which Polymer Clay Should I Buy? FAQs about different Clay Brands

Which Polymer Clay Should I Buy? FAQs about different Clay Brands

One thing I’ve been asked a lot in my craft by beginners is which clay brand they should buy when they’re starting out, or which clay brand is the “best” to use. So finally, I’ve decided to write a blog post about it! Actually this all has been written down a year or so ago in an e-book I was planning to finish but never continued—

There are different clay brands in the market from different brands, each with their own different properties. Not one is superior to the other—I personally think it’s a matter of what project they are suited to. If you make a wide variety of things like I do, it’d be best to keep stock of various brands that will fit your different projects.

Polymer clay is generally priced from 65-130PHP and is usually sold in 50g and 100g bars.


 photo IMG_0771_zps1f5loyze.jpgSculpey Bakeshop

One of the cheapest clay in the market. It is marketed as a kid’s polymer clay, thus it is very soft and easy to knead. Color selections are limited. It bakes brittle and heavy, with sort of a rough surface.

 photo IMG_0779_zpsx5utmz5m.jpgSculpey III

Sculpey III is easily bought in specialty art stores in the country and comes in a wide array of colors. The clay is soft and easy to condition, which is why it is recommended for beginners. The clay bakes with a matte, bisque finish.

 photo IMG_0775_zps9j3lnw7m.jpgPremo! By Sculpey

Premo is more pigmented compared to Sculpey III, and is a tiny bit more expensive. The clay bakes with a slight sheen, and has slight flexibility when baked in thin sections. Color selections are limited, and the complete colors are rarely carried in stores. This is a good choice for metallic-colored clays, and those with “special” colors (eg., marble, granite, glittered) The clay is a little firmer, making it suitable for detailed work. The clay cures to a slight sheen.

 photo IMG_0770_zpsaa9sh5oo.jpgFIMO Classic/Accents

FIMO Classic, manufactured by German company, Staedtler, is a very firm clay that requires a bit of conditioning, and in most cases, a clay softener. Despite that, this clay is still a favourite of many artists due to the great color selection, and the fact that the clay’s vibrant colors are retained very well even after being baked. FIMO Classic also cures with a glossy finish, almost like hard candy.

 photo IMG_0774_zps0ixuzdre.jpgFIMO Soft

FIMO Soft mostly has the Classic’s properties, except it’s (obviously) much softer and easier to knead. I find the colors from Soft have less shine when baked compared to Classic.

 photo IMG_0773_zpsnbct7xm3.jpgNendo Polymer Clay

Nendo is a locally-available clay that is noted for its supreme flexibility. The clay is easy to condition and is elastic. Once baked, the clay has a slight sheen, and is very flexible. As with flexible clays, the clay may be a bit sticky to work with for those with warm hands.

 photo flexi_1_zpsff65cf43.jpgFlexiclay 3 Polymer Clay

Another local brand, Flexiclay comes in a wide assortment of colors and, as the name suggests, has good flexibility. Flexi3 is firmer than Nendo, and is not as flexible, but it is easier to handle as they clay is not overly sticky or soft. To try out this clay and order some, you can check their facebook page here.

Sculpey Ultralight Clay

Most, if not all polymer clay has significant weight once they are cured, especially if you intend to make big pieces. Except Ultralight clay, which is almost like marshmallow to the touch. It only comes in one color (white) and is mostly used as the core or filler for bigger clay projects.

Liquid Clay

Different brands carry their own lines of Liquid Polymer clay that come in different colors. They become firm when baked, and are mostly used for adhering two pieces of clay together in the baking process, or as decorative “sauces” or paints.


Which Clay should I Use?

As I’ve said before, no clay is truly superior, each clay has its properties that makes it suitable for different types of projects.

Matte polymer clays that bake with a dry, “rough-to-the-touch” finish are ideal for paintwork. The rougher surfaces of these clays once baked make them ideal for being painted. Clays with a shiny finish will resist inks and paints unless they are roughened beforehand.

Firmer clays are ideal for detailwork such as engraving or carving out shapes or tiny details. Soft clays are easily distorted with a simple nudge, making them unideal. Firmer clays are recommended for making canes for the same reason.

Soft, flexible clays are ideal for making thin pieces pieces that have to resist breakage (ex. Flower petals). While soft, matte clays could also do the same thing, they bake hard and brittle, making thin pieces prone to snapping and breaking.


Hope this post helps you out if you’ve been trying to decide which brand to buy! Soon I might make a youtube guide so you can better see the qualities of the clay and their differences!

Polymer Clay Marshmallow Tutorial

Polymer Clay Marshmallow Tutorial

Hi guys! Today’s tutorial is a very easy and quick tut on how to make polymer clay marshmallows. These are very easy, and can be made in big batches for those who are looking to mass-produce these cute fluffy sweets! For the first time, our tutorial also comes with a video accompaniment, courtesy of our brand new Youtube Channel!! *w*

Let’s start on the tutorial! It’s very straightforward and easy to follow.

 photo COLLAGE_zpsvato1mbs.jpgFirstly, the materials. You’ll need your polymer clay–we recommend at least three pastel colors that are commonly seen in marshmallow twists–white, pastel pink, baby blue, pastel mint, etc. And all you need aside from that is a cutting blade. (top left photo)

Next, you should take each individual color of clay, and roll it into one long log. One log for each color! Try to make them as uniform and even with each other as possible. )top right photo)

Then you place the tips of these logs next to each other, and from then on start a twisting motion. It’s pretty much instinct and hard to put to words, but you’ll definitely get a feel for it when you’re actually doing it. You can also check out our video to get a good visual on how it’s done!

And there it is! All that’s left is to trim the ends, but into size, and bake according to your clay’s instructions. You may add some gloss to make it shiny too if you like!

 photo fin_02_zpszdf56qqu.pngYou can use them to make earrings, split them in half to make hairpins… be creative and think of whatever you want to do with them. ^^

You may also view the tutorial video if you’re more into visual examples and not written ones! Please follow our channel, we’ll be uploading tutorials weekly. ^^ Have fun and happy crafting!

Flexi 3 Polymer Clay Review

Flexi 3 Polymer Clay Review

Today I’ll be giving a quick review on Flexi 3 Polymer Clay. I started using this clay around August of 2014 when I picked some up at Kawaii in Manila 3, they had a booth there selling some of the clay and a workshop about claying too.

 photo flexi_2_zps332a86e2.jpgAs the instructions states, this is an oven bake clay that bakes at 135C, and is non-toxic.

As the sticker claims, I find it easy to condition and knead, which is perfect for my not-so-big-and-strong-hands. It’s not the softest clay in the market, but no one will have a hard time kneading this clay. There is also no odor and for a flexible clay, it is not sticky. (other “flexible” clays tend to be sticky and soft)

 photo flexi_3_zps020e9a35.jpgMarshmallows made with Flexi 3 Clay. The clay bakes with a slight satin sheen–it does not bake matte. If you can observe from this photo and the following ones, the light is reflected on their surface, indicating a slight shine on their surface. This is without the use of glosses or varnishes.

The colors also stay true to their original color and do not change after the baking process.

Their white clay is my favorite because it tends to retain its whiteness easier compared to other brands that pick up dirt very easily.

 photo flexi_4_zps312e4bea.jpgFor a flexibility test, I made this small twizzler. Again if you look at it, its surface reflects the light, indicating that the clay bakes with a slight shine on the surface.

 photo flexi_5_zps1719ce44.jpgThe twizzler/licorice cord can be bent without causing damage or breakage to the piece, so it’s true to it’s “flexible” claim. :3

 photo flexi_1_zpsff65cf43.jpgThis is currently one of my favorite clays and I would recommend it to any beginner. It is also easily available locally! You may contact the Glitz of Joy store on their facebook page for available colors and for the price of each bar.

Hope this helps! Tell me your own opinions if you’ve already tried out this clay!

xoxo,

Xarin

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This post is not sponsored.

 

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