Polymer Clay Cookie Sandwich Tutorial

Polymer Clay Cookie Sandwich Tutorial

HELLOOOOO KITTENS!! We’re finally back to blogging, technical issues with our internet connection and our website provider are now solved. *tears of joy* We’ve acquired quite the backlog, so let’s start and get our DIY ready right now! Today we bring you a polymer clay tutorial on how to make a “cookie sandwich”–a chocolate filling sandwiched between two crisp cookies… except it’s in clay and isn’t edible. xD

 photo cookiesandwich_10_zpsseciaof6.jpg

While you can’t eat them, they’d be perfect as keychains or phone charms, right?

 photo ingredients_zpsycshtbmy.jpgOur materials are as follows: Tan, white, translucent and yellow clay. Texturing tools like an old toothbrush and a pointed tool. Brown acrylic paint (i suggest something that’s not a dark muddy brown and instead is like a burnt or acorn brown), and your usual claying tools, like your roller and oven. We’re making cookies, so you also need cookie cutters in the shape you prefer.

 photo cookiesandwich_1_zpsmyqwaghy.jpg

Mix all your clay colors in the proportion pictured in the materials photo. You can actually just use one color of your preference, but I decided to mix colors because I really wanted to get the pale cookie dough look. Feel free to experiment with what colors you have available or what proportions you want. I want a classic cookie, so I’m using these colors.

 photo cookiesandwich_2_zpsphgpjqgh.jpgMix all the colors into a uniform, even sheet, and then take your cookie cutter out and cut out two cookie bases.

 photo cookiesandwich_3_zps5gybi7bj.jpgUsing a pointed tool, poke out holes in a uniform pattern that’s usually seen in cookies.

 photo cookiesandwich_4_zps6jxz0fdg.jpgRoughen up the cookie and make it look imperfect/not so smooth by dabbing an old toothbrush all over it.

 photo cookiesandwich_5_zpsmschppm6.jpgThe textured cookie should look like this. With that, you can bake this cookie in your oven according to your clay’s instructions. Don’t worry if it looks like it’s still raw and doesn’t have that golden-baked color! We’ll get to that after the baking~

 photo cookiesandwich_6_zps0t9qmkyn.jpgAfter the cookie is baked, take your brown acrylic paint and dab it onto the corners of the cookie, where the color should be more concentrated.

 photo cookiesandwich_7jpg_zpsi2ilwzee.jpgSpread the color from the corners towards the center. Looking more edible now huh?

 photo cookiesandwich_8_zpsklbo2b9s.jpgIf the color has become too strong for your liking, you can use a wet cloth to rub off the excess color to desaturate the color. After this, you can embellish the cookie by using some liquid clay/deco glue stick to make fake icing or such.

The cookie is perfectly fine as it is now, and I can imagine you can make pretty things like bracelets and earrings with a flat, one-layer cookie.

Oooorrr you can make a cookie sandwich!

 photo cookiesandwich_9_zpswu9pctpp.jpgSimply roll out a log of clay in whatever “filling” you prefer, and use some liquid clay to attach it. And then sandwich it between two cookies, and bake again using your clay’s instructions.

 photo IMG_3521_zpshgwrxfa5.jpgYum yum!

Happy crafting!

Let’s Make (Fake) Macarons! Polymer Clay Macaron Tutorial

Let’s Make (Fake) Macarons! Polymer Clay Macaron Tutorial

MACARONS ARE FAMOUS worldwide not only as a tasty treat, but as a fashion statement and an absolute staple when it comes to fake sweets crafting. Today I’m going to show you how to make a macaron out of polymer clay, a project easy enough for beginners and still enjoyable for crafters of all levels. Here comes our polymer clay macaron tutorial!

 photo IMG_3393_zpshjxzmnhn.jpgMaterials:

  • Polymer clay for the macaron shell. I’m using Mint from FIMO Accent, but use any color you want!
  • Polymer clay for the macaron filling; I’m using Flexiclay 3 White.
  • Polymer clay template. Optional, but helps a lot. You can easily substitute it with a circle cut-out from paper. Cut out a circle that’s as big as you want your macaron shell to be.
  • Craft Knife
  • Chalk Pastel, preferably a color darker than the color you’re using for the macaron shells. Optional, am just going to use it for a more realistic look.
  • Toothpicks, needles, or other pointed tools for texturing
  • Old toothbrush. Optional.
  • Any object with a flat top that can be used to press your clay. Can be your own acrylic roller.

 photo IMG_3396_zpszcfszhyo.jpgCondition the mint clay and then roll out an even sheet with your acrylic roller or pasta machine. Thickness depends on the size of the macaron you are making, ideally 1/3 or 1/4 thickness of your shell. Cut out two circles of the size that you want your macaron shells to be. I use 3/4 inch diameter. These disks will be the “feet” of your macaron. Set aside.
 photo IMG_3397_zpsnebury5e.jpg photo IMG_3400_zpsxymbk3rr.jpgPrepare two balls of polymer clay of the same size.  Using any object with a flat, smooth end, press each ball down into the same size you made your flat disks earlier. Make sure the clay is conditioned well so there are no cracks when you press them down!
 photo IMG_3404_zpsadwjuopn.jpgLayer this flat-top dome and the flat disks you made from earlier like so.
 photo IMG_3407_zpsnwgvnaul.jpgUsing pointed items, like toothpicks or needles, add texture to the flat disk part (the “feet” of the macaron) by swirling your needle/toothpick around and just making random movements. It will make “crumbs” in the surface, to imitate what the feet of a macaron look like. (yes that part’s called the “feet”)
 photo IMG_3409_zpskljysqce.jpgTo add texture, you can take an old toothbrush and roughen up the top shell, for a more realistic look. If you’re going for the smooth look though, you can skip it!

I like to bake my shells after this step, to preserve the texturing on this feet. Too much handling can make you lose the “crumbs”, so I like to bake it as soon as I can. I also like to just make many shells in one go and store them, adding the filling later.
 photo IMG_3411_zpsiqy51cvo.jpgWhen it’s baked and cooled, again, for a more realistic look, brush on some sealer/gloss (I use New Future gloss) onto the shells and scrape some chalk pastel with a craft knife onto the macaron shells. The still-wet sealer will help the chalk powder stick to the shell. When the first coat is dry, brush with it another layer of sealer gently, as to not rub out the chalk pastel. I find real macarons sometimes have darker sections in them and are rarely as smooth and perfect as decoden ones, so I decided to add “spots” to mine. Some macaron flavors also intentionally have this look–say, chocolate orange macarons. But if you’re going for the smooth look, feel free to skip this as well.
 photo filling_step_zpsbrrl7dcr.pngRoll out your white clay into a long, thin log. Make it as thin/thick as you want the filling to be. Take this log and cut it up just enough to go around the macaron. This will be the “filling”–it’s ok if it’s hollow inside since no one will open it up anyway! Finally put the two shells together sandwiching the filling inside. Put in any metal findings like eyepins at this step.

Apart from clay for the filling, there are alternatives like silicone icing, or air-dry decoden icing that are available in specialty craft online stores.

Bake again~ And you’re done!
 photo 3sk_fb_zpssnnggrbn.jpg

Have fun!

Tutorial: Ace Attorney Badge

Tutorial: Ace Attorney Badge

This is the delayed accompaniment post to our Ace Attorney Defense Badge tutorial! The Attorney Badge will complete any Ace Attorney cosplay, if you’re going as Phoenix, Mia, Apollo, or Athena. This tutorial uses polymer clay.

 photo materials_zpsixgl2i8n.jpgMATERIALS:

  • A circle template. If you don’t have a store-bought one, you draw circles using a compass on paper, and cut that out, to use as your template. Make your circle depending on how big you want your badge to be.
  • Gold polymer clay. We paint our badge after its baked so if you intend to do the same, color hardly matters.
  • Craft knife
  • Rubber shaping tools. Optional, but really help.
  • A pointed item, like a toothpick
  • Fade-proof, waterproof ink pen.
  • Brooch pins.
  • Paint or pigment of your choice. I will be using gold metallic spraypaint.

 photo 1_zpsmcsktswv.pngCondition and flatten your clay into an even sheet. Then cut out two disks of the size you want.

 photo 2_zpss2o6cnye.pngOn the second disk, cut out another circle in the center of it. You won’t be using that circle. Layer this “circle-with-a-circle-cut-out” on top of the first disk. You can make the edges smoother and more rounded using a rubber tool, or your fingernails.

 photo 5_zpspqavpd51.pngThe disk with the cut out will become the raised border around the badge. Using a toothpick, mark out the lines that will be the divisions in the border.

 photo 6_zps4jsyjlhg.pngStill using the toothpick, push these lines into the center of the disk, and drag it out was well toward the edges.

 photo 7_zpsbwn6fjmj.pngYou want it to look seamless to the first disk and not just something put on top.

Bake according to your clay’s instructions. After it has been cooled, I also spray it with some gold paint.

 photo 10_zps3yt9fpuo.pngAfterwards, I take my fade-proof, water-proof pen and manually draw the Libra scale in the middle of the badge. Practice first and use a good reference! I messed up mine a bit. xD

After that, it’s just a matter of waiting for the ink to dry and then sealing it in, and then attaching the brooch pins to the back.
 photo IMG_2978_zpslzqldybq.jpgYou now have a cute Defense Attorney badge! For those who prefer seeing things in motion, our video tutorial is also below. Please subscribe if you’d like to get updated on tutorials of cosplay or cute items!

You may also buy a badge from our Etsy shop here.

Thanks and have a great day! Happy crafting!

Polymer Clay Marshmallow Tutorial

Polymer Clay Marshmallow Tutorial

Hi guys! Today’s tutorial is a very easy and quick tut on how to make polymer clay marshmallows. These are very easy, and can be made in big batches for those who are looking to mass-produce these cute fluffy sweets! For the first time, our tutorial also comes with a video accompaniment, courtesy of our brand new Youtube Channel!! *w*

Let’s start on the tutorial! It’s very straightforward and easy to follow.

 photo COLLAGE_zpsvato1mbs.jpgFirstly, the materials. You’ll need your polymer clay–we recommend at least three pastel colors that are commonly seen in marshmallow twists–white, pastel pink, baby blue, pastel mint, etc. And all you need aside from that is a cutting blade. (top left photo)

Next, you should take each individual color of clay, and roll it into one long log. One log for each color! Try to make them as uniform and even with each other as possible. )top right photo)

Then you place the tips of these logs next to each other, and from then on start a twisting motion. It’s pretty much instinct and hard to put to words, but you’ll definitely get a feel for it when you’re actually doing it. You can also check out our video to get a good visual on how it’s done!

And there it is! All that’s left is to trim the ends, but into size, and bake according to your clay’s instructions. You may add some gloss to make it shiny too if you like!

 photo fin_02_zpszdf56qqu.pngYou can use them to make earrings, split them in half to make hairpins… be creative and think of whatever you want to do with them. ^^

You may also view the tutorial video if you’re more into visual examples and not written ones! Please follow our channel, we’ll be uploading tutorials weekly. ^^ Have fun and happy crafting!

Flexi 3 Polymer Clay Review

Flexi 3 Polymer Clay Review

Today I’ll be giving a quick review on Flexi 3 Polymer Clay. I started using this clay around August of 2014 when I picked some up at Kawaii in Manila 3, they had a booth there selling some of the clay and a workshop about claying too.

 photo flexi_2_zps332a86e2.jpgAs the instructions states, this is an oven bake clay that bakes at 135C, and is non-toxic.

As the sticker claims, I find it easy to condition and knead, which is perfect for my not-so-big-and-strong-hands. It’s not the softest clay in the market, but no one will have a hard time kneading this clay. There is also no odor and for a flexible clay, it is not sticky. (other “flexible” clays tend to be sticky and soft)

 photo flexi_3_zps020e9a35.jpgMarshmallows made with Flexi 3 Clay. The clay bakes with a slight satin sheen–it does not bake matte. If you can observe from this photo and the following ones, the light is reflected on their surface, indicating a slight shine on their surface. This is without the use of glosses or varnishes.

The colors also stay true to their original color and do not change after the baking process.

Their white clay is my favorite because it tends to retain its whiteness easier compared to other brands that pick up dirt very easily.

 photo flexi_4_zps312e4bea.jpgFor a flexibility test, I made this small twizzler. Again if you look at it, its surface reflects the light, indicating that the clay bakes with a slight shine on the surface.

 photo flexi_5_zps1719ce44.jpgThe twizzler/licorice cord can be bent without causing damage or breakage to the piece, so it’s true to it’s “flexible” claim. :3

 photo flexi_1_zpsff65cf43.jpgThis is currently one of my favorite clays and I would recommend it to any beginner. It is also easily available locally! You may contact the Glitz of Joy store on their facebook page for available colors and for the price of each bar.

Hope this helps! Tell me your own opinions if you’ve already tried out this clay!

xoxo,

Xarin

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This post is not sponsored.

 

Polymer Clay Tip: Restore Dried / Hard Clay

Polymer Clay Tip: Restore Dried / Hard Clay

HELLO EVERYONE! Today I have another quick tip/tutorial for polymer clay enthusiasts–how to restore or soften dried or hard clay. If you’ve ever bought an unlucky bar of clay that was just ROCK HARD then you’ll know what I’m talking about. Sometimes you just get unlucky and buy a pack that’s rock hard and FLAKY. The clay doesn’t like to stick to each other and instead just crumbles like a bad piece of pastry.

There’s an easy solution to this problem though!

 photo restore_clay_1_zps833b28d8.jpgYou’ll just need some oil, and a resealable plastic packet. Other sorts of oil can be used I hear, but the most common and the one I use is ordinary baby oil.

 photo restore_clay_2_zps91abc18a.jpgThe clay I’m restoring for this example is FIMO Classic Raspberry. This really isn’t “old” but FIMO Classic in itself is a particularly hard clay. I cut it up a bit so you see what I mean by “flaky”–the clay tends to crumble off when cut, which isn’t what you want.

 photo restore_clay_3_zps7e312405.jpgI just pop it into a resealable pouch and then pour a few drops of oil in it. I let it sit overnight or for however long I want the oil to sink in. Sometimes I leave it there until I need to use the clay! It’s guaranteed to restore the softness in the clay.

I recommend doing this for cut bars–don’t condition the clay you mean to soak beforehand, or else it could end up too soft. Soft enough to qualify as clay icing for cakes! Unless that’s what you mean to achieve. If you want icing-soft clay, just condition clay and let it soak in oil for a good amount of time. Trust me, you won’t need to stir it long like the liquid-clay technique just to get it to icing consistency!

But what would happen if it gets too soft for your tastes? What you can do is take the clay out of the pack and then just let it rest between sheets of paper, tissue, or whatever absorbent material. The paper will absorb the oils in the clay. You can let it sit for as long as you like, when the oils are absorbed to your liking.

Hope this tip helps!

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