Which Polymer Clay Should I Buy? FAQs about different Clay Brands

Which Polymer Clay Should I Buy? FAQs about different Clay Brands

One thing I’ve been asked a lot in my craft by beginners is which clay brand they should buy when they’re starting out, or which clay brand is the “best” to use. So finally, I’ve decided to write a blog post about it! Actually this all has been written down a year or so ago in an e-book I was planning to finish but never continued—

There are different clay brands in the market from different brands, each with their own different properties. Not one is superior to the other—I personally think it’s a matter of what project they are suited to. If you make a wide variety of things like I do, it’d be best to keep stock of various brands that will fit your different projects.

Polymer clay is generally priced from 65-130PHP and is usually sold in 50g and 100g bars.


 photo IMG_0771_zps1f5loyze.jpgSculpey Bakeshop

One of the cheapest clay in the market. It is marketed as a kid’s polymer clay, thus it is very soft and easy to knead. Color selections are limited. It bakes brittle and heavy, with sort of a rough surface.

 photo IMG_0779_zpsx5utmz5m.jpgSculpey III

Sculpey III is easily bought in specialty art stores in the country and comes in a wide array of colors. The clay is soft and easy to condition, which is why it is recommended for beginners. The clay bakes with a matte, bisque finish.

 photo IMG_0775_zps9j3lnw7m.jpgPremo! By Sculpey

Premo is more pigmented compared to Sculpey III, and is a tiny bit more expensive. The clay bakes with a slight sheen, and has slight flexibility when baked in thin sections. Color selections are limited, and the complete colors are rarely carried in stores. This is a good choice for metallic-colored clays, and those with “special” colors (eg., marble, granite, glittered) The clay is a little firmer, making it suitable for detailed work. The clay cures to a slight sheen.

 photo IMG_0770_zpsaa9sh5oo.jpgFIMO Classic/Accents

FIMO Classic, manufactured by German company, Staedtler, is a very firm clay that requires a bit of conditioning, and in most cases, a clay softener. Despite that, this clay is still a favourite of many artists due to the great color selection, and the fact that the clay’s vibrant colors are retained very well even after being baked. FIMO Classic also cures with a glossy finish, almost like hard candy.

 photo IMG_0774_zps0ixuzdre.jpgFIMO Soft

FIMO Soft mostly has the Classic’s properties, except it’s (obviously) much softer and easier to knead. I find the colors from Soft have less shine when baked compared to Classic.

 photo IMG_0773_zpsnbct7xm3.jpgNendo Polymer Clay

Nendo is a locally-available clay that is noted for its supreme flexibility. The clay is easy to condition and is elastic. Once baked, the clay has a slight sheen, and is very flexible. As with flexible clays, the clay may be a bit sticky to work with for those with warm hands.

 photo flexi_1_zpsff65cf43.jpgFlexiclay 3 Polymer Clay

Another local brand, Flexiclay comes in a wide assortment of colors and, as the name suggests, has good flexibility. Flexi3 is firmer than Nendo, and is not as flexible, but it is easier to handle as they clay is not overly sticky or soft. To try out this clay and order some, you can check their facebook page here.

Sculpey Ultralight Clay

Most, if not all polymer clay has significant weight once they are cured, especially if you intend to make big pieces. Except Ultralight clay, which is almost like marshmallow to the touch. It only comes in one color (white) and is mostly used as the core or filler for bigger clay projects.

Liquid Clay

Different brands carry their own lines of Liquid Polymer clay that come in different colors. They become firm when baked, and are mostly used for adhering two pieces of clay together in the baking process, or as decorative “sauces” or paints.


Which Clay should I Use?

As I’ve said before, no clay is truly superior, each clay has its properties that makes it suitable for different types of projects.

Matte polymer clays that bake with a dry, “rough-to-the-touch” finish are ideal for paintwork. The rougher surfaces of these clays once baked make them ideal for being painted. Clays with a shiny finish will resist inks and paints unless they are roughened beforehand.

Firmer clays are ideal for detailwork such as engraving or carving out shapes or tiny details. Soft clays are easily distorted with a simple nudge, making them unideal. Firmer clays are recommended for making canes for the same reason.

Soft, flexible clays are ideal for making thin pieces pieces that have to resist breakage (ex. Flower petals). While soft, matte clays could also do the same thing, they bake hard and brittle, making thin pieces prone to snapping and breaking.


Hope this post helps you out if you’ve been trying to decide which brand to buy! Soon I might make a youtube guide so you can better see the qualities of the clay and their differences!

Maya Fey: Cosplay Construction Notes

Maya Fey: Cosplay Construction Notes

Hello to another construction note entry from me! This time, I’ll be walking you through how I made my Ace Attorney: Maya Fey costume. It’s actually a pretty easy project to tackle; Maya’s outfit is meant to be loose-fitting, so accuracy in fit is not much of an issue. The colors are basic with no prints, so there’s little need to match up things. You can also complete the cosplay in a matter of a few days, even if you’re an amateur. I hope this entry helps you with making your own Maya costume!

 photo maya_pattern_zpspvyz2jat.pngFirst, let’s start off with the pattern for the kimono top. Before proceeding, I’d like to tell everyone I’m no expert in drafting patterns and took no professional classes; I make things based on instinct and just observing how clothes are made. My way may be technically incorrect, but they work for casual costuming. So that also explains why there won’t be technical sewing jargon here, and why the pattern draft I’m showing is very… raw. xD

I drafted a one-piece pattern that only joins at the shoulders, as opposed to a four-piece pattern. This is kinda more authentic to what she’s really wearing, and let’s face it; seams are unflattering. This pattern joins together at the shoulder seams only.

The whole garment is based off of the widest measurement in your body that the garment will cover. For mine, it’s the hip measurement. If your bust is bigger than your hip, you should be basing this measurement off of your bust instead. The other measurements needed are the whole length of the garment (I had it fall to my mid-thigh) and armhole measurement.

I just basically joined it at the shoulder seams and turned the armhole allowance and sewed it down. For strip down the front of the kimono, I cut out a long rectangle of fabric, folded it in half, and used it to encase the raw edge of the garment.

I added some darts to give it more shape, instead of something that was entirely loose.

I WILL PROBABLY EDIT THIS ARTICLE AND GIVE A MORE ACCURATE PATTERN SOMETIME

 photo maya_0_zpsr7h1gkdn.pngI regret not having photos to show you the process… xD

The purple cardigan/jacket thing on top of it was made with the same base pattern as the kimono, but of course with sleeves, and the front parts were edited so that they don’t overlap each other. I made them slightly less wide, so that the front part doesn’t close all the way, like Maya’s own purple throw jacket thingy.
 photo maya_1_zpsu3qpqj0u.pngThe red sash was one big strip of rectangle that i just tie/knot into place. The red bow that goes with it was a detachable bow that I just pin onto the sash. Because I can’t knot a pretty bow even if I tried, so I thought it’d be more convenient of the bow was detachable.

 photo maya_3_zpskk2ep9qa.pngThe wig was honestly fun to style! Okay it was frustrating at first, but then I figured how to get that neat topknot. You’ll have to use barettes–the ones that have a spring-like thing inside?! Not that ones that you snap shut. This evenly distributes the wig fibers into a wide section, as opposed to just one section if you tie it with an elastic. I used two barettes, and sandwiched the topknot in between those, to get it to stay in place. I used purple polymer clay on the barette fronts, to match the ones Maya is using.

 photo maya_2_zps3aj1h4mh.pngThe round hair orbs are also made from polymer clay. I used Ultralight clay inside (so it doesn’t weight too much), and covered it with Sculpey’s purple, and then punched an hole through the orb with a stick or whatever you have on hand. How do I get it to stay on the wig? First, you have to section the hair and tie it around the part you want the orb to stay with hair elastic, and then slip the orbs over to those elastics. The orbs will grip the hair elastics and stay in place.

The magatama necklace was also made with polymer clay, the bigger orbs made with Ultralight. I threaded them with nylon string (the transparent fishing line stuff apparently?) to create the illusion that they’re floating, because Maya’s necklace in all her art is like, where’s the thread holding them together?!

The wrist bracelets were red bias tape strands that I just knotted into place. xD For makeup, I made it light, and “barely-there”–just focusing on clear skin and bigger eyes. I didn’t even put on falsies! They will just be covered up by her bangs haha

 photo mystery_burger_zpsy6lazdu8.jpgSo I think that covers it! Find your Nick, get ready to hit the courtrooms, point fingers, and yell “OBJECTION!”

Feel free to ask anything in the comments!

xoxo, Xarin

Polymer Clay Cookie Sandwich Tutorial

Polymer Clay Cookie Sandwich Tutorial

HELLOOOOO KITTENS!! We’re finally back to blogging, technical issues with our internet connection and our website provider are now solved. *tears of joy* We’ve acquired quite the backlog, so let’s start and get our DIY ready right now! Today we bring you a polymer clay tutorial on how to make a “cookie sandwich”–a chocolate filling sandwiched between two crisp cookies… except it’s in clay and isn’t edible. xD

 photo cookiesandwich_10_zpsseciaof6.jpg

While you can’t eat them, they’d be perfect as keychains or phone charms, right?

 photo ingredients_zpsycshtbmy.jpgOur materials are as follows: Tan, white, translucent and yellow clay. Texturing tools like an old toothbrush and a pointed tool. Brown acrylic paint (i suggest something that’s not a dark muddy brown and instead is like a burnt or acorn brown), and your usual claying tools, like your roller and oven. We’re making cookies, so you also need cookie cutters in the shape you prefer.

 photo cookiesandwich_1_zpsmyqwaghy.jpg

Mix all your clay colors in the proportion pictured in the materials photo. You can actually just use one color of your preference, but I decided to mix colors because I really wanted to get the pale cookie dough look. Feel free to experiment with what colors you have available or what proportions you want. I want a classic cookie, so I’m using these colors.

 photo cookiesandwich_2_zpsphgpjqgh.jpgMix all the colors into a uniform, even sheet, and then take your cookie cutter out and cut out two cookie bases.

 photo cookiesandwich_3_zps5gybi7bj.jpgUsing a pointed tool, poke out holes in a uniform pattern that’s usually seen in cookies.

 photo cookiesandwich_4_zps6jxz0fdg.jpgRoughen up the cookie and make it look imperfect/not so smooth by dabbing an old toothbrush all over it.

 photo cookiesandwich_5_zpsmschppm6.jpgThe textured cookie should look like this. With that, you can bake this cookie in your oven according to your clay’s instructions. Don’t worry if it looks like it’s still raw and doesn’t have that golden-baked color! We’ll get to that after the baking~

 photo cookiesandwich_6_zps0t9qmkyn.jpgAfter the cookie is baked, take your brown acrylic paint and dab it onto the corners of the cookie, where the color should be more concentrated.

 photo cookiesandwich_7jpg_zpsi2ilwzee.jpgSpread the color from the corners towards the center. Looking more edible now huh?

 photo cookiesandwich_8_zpsklbo2b9s.jpgIf the color has become too strong for your liking, you can use a wet cloth to rub off the excess color to desaturate the color. After this, you can embellish the cookie by using some liquid clay/deco glue stick to make fake icing or such.

The cookie is perfectly fine as it is now, and I can imagine you can make pretty things like bracelets and earrings with a flat, one-layer cookie.

Oooorrr you can make a cookie sandwich!

 photo cookiesandwich_9_zpswu9pctpp.jpgSimply roll out a log of clay in whatever “filling” you prefer, and use some liquid clay to attach it. And then sandwich it between two cookies, and bake again using your clay’s instructions.

 photo IMG_3521_zpshgwrxfa5.jpgYum yum!

Happy crafting!

Let’s Make (Fake) Macarons! Polymer Clay Macaron Tutorial

Let’s Make (Fake) Macarons! Polymer Clay Macaron Tutorial

MACARONS ARE FAMOUS worldwide not only as a tasty treat, but as a fashion statement and an absolute staple when it comes to fake sweets crafting. Today I’m going to show you how to make a macaron out of polymer clay, a project easy enough for beginners and still enjoyable for crafters of all levels. Here comes our polymer clay macaron tutorial!

 photo IMG_3393_zpshjxzmnhn.jpgMaterials:

  • Polymer clay for the macaron shell. I’m using Mint from FIMO Accent, but use any color you want!
  • Polymer clay for the macaron filling; I’m using Flexiclay 3 White.
  • Polymer clay template. Optional, but helps a lot. You can easily substitute it with a circle cut-out from paper. Cut out a circle that’s as big as you want your macaron shell to be.
  • Craft Knife
  • Chalk Pastel, preferably a color darker than the color you’re using for the macaron shells. Optional, am just going to use it for a more realistic look.
  • Toothpicks, needles, or other pointed tools for texturing
  • Old toothbrush. Optional.
  • Any object with a flat top that can be used to press your clay. Can be your own acrylic roller.

 photo IMG_3396_zpszcfszhyo.jpgCondition the mint clay and then roll out an even sheet with your acrylic roller or pasta machine. Thickness depends on the size of the macaron you are making, ideally 1/3 or 1/4 thickness of your shell. Cut out two circles of the size that you want your macaron shells to be. I use 3/4 inch diameter. These disks will be the “feet” of your macaron. Set aside.
 photo IMG_3397_zpsnebury5e.jpg photo IMG_3400_zpsxymbk3rr.jpgPrepare two balls of polymer clay of the same size.  Using any object with a flat, smooth end, press each ball down into the same size you made your flat disks earlier. Make sure the clay is conditioned well so there are no cracks when you press them down!
 photo IMG_3404_zpsadwjuopn.jpgLayer this flat-top dome and the flat disks you made from earlier like so.
 photo IMG_3407_zpsnwgvnaul.jpgUsing pointed items, like toothpicks or needles, add texture to the flat disk part (the “feet” of the macaron) by swirling your needle/toothpick around and just making random movements. It will make “crumbs” in the surface, to imitate what the feet of a macaron look like. (yes that part’s called the “feet”)
 photo IMG_3409_zpskljysqce.jpgTo add texture, you can take an old toothbrush and roughen up the top shell, for a more realistic look. If you’re going for the smooth look though, you can skip it!

I like to bake my shells after this step, to preserve the texturing on this feet. Too much handling can make you lose the “crumbs”, so I like to bake it as soon as I can. I also like to just make many shells in one go and store them, adding the filling later.
 photo IMG_3411_zpsiqy51cvo.jpgWhen it’s baked and cooled, again, for a more realistic look, brush on some sealer/gloss (I use New Future gloss) onto the shells and scrape some chalk pastel with a craft knife onto the macaron shells. The still-wet sealer will help the chalk powder stick to the shell. When the first coat is dry, brush with it another layer of sealer gently, as to not rub out the chalk pastel. I find real macarons sometimes have darker sections in them and are rarely as smooth and perfect as decoden ones, so I decided to add “spots” to mine. Some macaron flavors also intentionally have this look–say, chocolate orange macarons. But if you’re going for the smooth look, feel free to skip this as well.
 photo filling_step_zpsbrrl7dcr.pngRoll out your white clay into a long, thin log. Make it as thin/thick as you want the filling to be. Take this log and cut it up just enough to go around the macaron. This will be the “filling”–it’s ok if it’s hollow inside since no one will open it up anyway! Finally put the two shells together sandwiching the filling inside. Put in any metal findings like eyepins at this step.

Apart from clay for the filling, there are alternatives like silicone icing, or air-dry decoden icing that are available in specialty craft online stores.

Bake again~ And you’re done!
 photo 3sk_fb_zpssnnggrbn.jpg

Have fun!

Tutorial: Ace Attorney Badge

Tutorial: Ace Attorney Badge

This is the delayed accompaniment post to our Ace Attorney Defense Badge tutorial! The Attorney Badge will complete any Ace Attorney cosplay, if you’re going as Phoenix, Mia, Apollo, or Athena. This tutorial uses polymer clay.

 photo materials_zpsixgl2i8n.jpgMATERIALS:

  • A circle template. If you don’t have a store-bought one, you draw circles using a compass on paper, and cut that out, to use as your template. Make your circle depending on how big you want your badge to be.
  • Gold polymer clay. We paint our badge after its baked so if you intend to do the same, color hardly matters.
  • Craft knife
  • Rubber shaping tools. Optional, but really help.
  • A pointed item, like a toothpick
  • Fade-proof, waterproof ink pen.
  • Brooch pins.
  • Paint or pigment of your choice. I will be using gold metallic spraypaint.

 photo 1_zpsmcsktswv.pngCondition and flatten your clay into an even sheet. Then cut out two disks of the size you want.

 photo 2_zpss2o6cnye.pngOn the second disk, cut out another circle in the center of it. You won’t be using that circle. Layer this “circle-with-a-circle-cut-out” on top of the first disk. You can make the edges smoother and more rounded using a rubber tool, or your fingernails.

 photo 5_zpspqavpd51.pngThe disk with the cut out will become the raised border around the badge. Using a toothpick, mark out the lines that will be the divisions in the border.

 photo 6_zps4jsyjlhg.pngStill using the toothpick, push these lines into the center of the disk, and drag it out was well toward the edges.

 photo 7_zpsbwn6fjmj.pngYou want it to look seamless to the first disk and not just something put on top.

Bake according to your clay’s instructions. After it has been cooled, I also spray it with some gold paint.

 photo 10_zps3yt9fpuo.pngAfterwards, I take my fade-proof, water-proof pen and manually draw the Libra scale in the middle of the badge. Practice first and use a good reference! I messed up mine a bit. xD

After that, it’s just a matter of waiting for the ink to dry and then sealing it in, and then attaching the brooch pins to the back.
 photo IMG_2978_zpslzqldybq.jpgYou now have a cute Defense Attorney badge! For those who prefer seeing things in motion, our video tutorial is also below. Please subscribe if you’d like to get updated on tutorials of cosplay or cute items!

You may also buy a badge from our Etsy shop here.

Thanks and have a great day! Happy crafting!

Polymer Clay Marshmallow Tutorial

Polymer Clay Marshmallow Tutorial

Hi guys! Today’s tutorial is a very easy and quick tut on how to make polymer clay marshmallows. These are very easy, and can be made in big batches for those who are looking to mass-produce these cute fluffy sweets! For the first time, our tutorial also comes with a video accompaniment, courtesy of our brand new Youtube Channel!! *w*

Let’s start on the tutorial! It’s very straightforward and easy to follow.

 photo COLLAGE_zpsvato1mbs.jpgFirstly, the materials. You’ll need your polymer clay–we recommend at least three pastel colors that are commonly seen in marshmallow twists–white, pastel pink, baby blue, pastel mint, etc. And all you need aside from that is a cutting blade. (top left photo)

Next, you should take each individual color of clay, and roll it into one long log. One log for each color! Try to make them as uniform and even with each other as possible. )top right photo)

Then you place the tips of these logs next to each other, and from then on start a twisting motion. It’s pretty much instinct and hard to put to words, but you’ll definitely get a feel for it when you’re actually doing it. You can also check out our video to get a good visual on how it’s done!

And there it is! All that’s left is to trim the ends, but into size, and bake according to your clay’s instructions. You may add some gloss to make it shiny too if you like!

 photo fin_02_zpszdf56qqu.pngYou can use them to make earrings, split them in half to make hairpins… be creative and think of whatever you want to do with them. ^^

You may also view the tutorial video if you’re more into visual examples and not written ones! Please follow our channel, we’ll be uploading tutorials weekly. ^^ Have fun and happy crafting!

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